Buyers

Found 42 blog entries about Buyers.

The ultimate timeline ensures the smoothest of transitions.

A real yard. Closets bigger than your average microwave. The freedom to decorate however you darn well please! Making the switch from renting to owning is exhilarating, but many rookie homebuyers find the process trickier to navigate than they expected.

This is why we created our First-Time HomeBuyer Checklist. The 12-month timeline will help you sidestep common mistakes, like paying too much interest or getting stuck with the wrong house. (Yep, it happens!)

12 Months Out

Check your credit score.Get a copy of your credit report at annualcreditreport.com. The three credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion) are each required to give you a free credit report once a year. A

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By ERIK SHERMAN / www.Houselogic.com

One of the biggest misconceptions of homebuying? The 20% down payment. Here’s how to buy with a lot less down.

Buying your first home conjures up all kinds of warm and fuzzy emotions: pride, joy, contentment. But before you get to the good stuff, you’ve got to cobble together a down payment, a daunting sum if you follow the textbook advice to squirrel away 20% of a home’s cost.

Here are five creative ways to build your down-payment nest egg faster than you may have ever imagined.

1. Crowdsource Your Dream Home

You may have heard of people using sites like Kickstarter to fund creative projects like short films and concert tours. Well, who says you can’t crowdsource your first home? Forget the traditional

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Real Estate App Offers Answers to 12 Common Consumer Questions by RPR

Providing immediate answers to client concerns and questions, while in the car or at the curb, will turn the tide in any agent’s favor. And there’s an app for that.

Here are the top 12 reported ways that agents use the RPR app to educate buyers. Download the app on your smartphone today and be prepared to respond to your client’s questions tomorrow.

1. “How is the market doing?”

What Realtor hasn’t heard this question while with buyers or in the checkout line at the grocery store? Give them the facts by swiping to the left from your app’s home screen. Local Market Conditions will display estimated home values, sale prices, changes in market, and days in RPR. Then ask for

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By Daniel Bortz | May 17, 2017

Long before home buyers decide a certain place must be theirs, it behooves them to ask a lot of questions. For example: "How's the neighborhood?" or "How old is that water heater, anyway?" Ask away! Such queries help you pare down your options, so don't be bashful; real estate agents have heard them all.

However, the adage "There's no such thing as a stupid question" isn't always true. As proof, just check out this list of the strangest questions real estate agents have ever heard about a house. Cue the “Twilight Zone” music—things are about to get very, very weird.

1. 'How do you keep alligators from coming up into the toilet?'

Michael Lyons, a real estate broker with Lyons Realty Group in Hollywood, FL, has

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Sixty-one percent of U.S. adults believe home prices in their local area will rise over the next 12 months, the highest percentage since Gallup began collecting such data in 2005. That also marks a big difference between 2008 and 2012, when no more than one-third of Americans believed home prices would increase.

Residents in the western region of the U.S. are the most optimistic, with nearly three-quarters of residents saying they expect price increases compared to slightly more than half of Midwestern and Eastern residents, according to the Gallup poll. With mortgage rates sitting below 4 percent, consumers may have more incentive to act now before home prices rise even more.

Sixty-seven percent of U.S. adults say now is a good time to

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Getty Images | Underwater Home Loan

by Steve Sinovic /Albuquerque Journal Staff Writer

In more good news for the real-estate market, thousands of Albuquerque-area residents have regained equity in their homes.

At the end of last year, 5.3 percent of all residential properties with mortgages in the metro area, or 9,359 homes, were in negative equity. That compares to 9.5 percent in December 2015, or 16,701 homes, according to home-equity data from CoreLogic. Having negative equity, often referred to as being “underwater” or “upside down,” applies to borrowers who owe more on their mortgages than their homes are worth. Negative equity, one of the long shadows cast by the housing bubble, can occur because of a decline in home value, an increase in mortgage debt or both.

The growth

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Once a buyer settles on a home, they often show their commitment with an earnest-money deposit. But if they’re not careful, they could lose thousands of dollars.

Realtor.com® recently featured some of the biggest mistakes home buyers most often make with earnest-money deposits, including:

Failing to understand exactly what an earnest-money deposit is.

It is proof that a buyer is committed to completing the sale. Earnest money is used as credit toward the down payment and closing costs. It’s often a negotiable amount between the buyer and seller and usually about 1 percent to 2 percent of the purchase price, although it could be much higher.

Not offering up enough.

When a market is competitive, offering more earnest money may be one way to

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Updated Servicing Rule Provides Surviving Family Members and Other Homeowners with Same Protections as Original Borrowers

Washington, D.C. (August 4, 2016) – The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) today finalized new measures to ensure that homeowners and struggling borrowers are treated fairly by mortgage servicers. The updated rule requires servicers to provide certain borrowers with foreclosure protections more than once over the life of the loan, clarifies borrower protections when the servicing of a loan is transferred, and provides important loan information to borrowers in bankruptcy. The changes also help ensure that surviving family members and others who inherit or receive property generally have the same protections under the

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 us capital building

Source: HomeOwnershipMatters.realtor

Fast Fact: The National Association of REALTORS® Issues Mobilization grants help keep you and your neighbors aware and informed about public policy changes that would impact your wallet and your home.

Too often, legislators target homeowners when seeking to fund federal programs. Even recently, some tried to put the financial burden of highway and transportation programs on the backs of homeowners.

A proposal in Congress would have diverted Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac’s guarantee fees (sometimes called “G fees”) to pay for these long overdue national highway and transportation improvements. Each time G fees are used for unrelated government spending, America’s homeowners wind up paying more for their

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Image of cyber hacker with laptop

Phishing, hacking, wire fraud  these are all ways people attempt to steal from others online. As real estate searches and transactions move more and more online, the chances of being caught up in a cyber scam have become even greater.

“By now most people have heard of the Nigerian prince scams or phishing emails asking for social security or banking information, but many people don’t know that they need to watch out for possible scams when buying or selling their home,” said Jon Schnoor, 2016 President of the Greater Albuquerque Association of Realtors®. “Cybercrimes have become increasingly sophisticated over the years and the people perpetrating them focus on situations where a lot of money is changing hands, making real estate transactions an

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